The Inuit of Kugaaruk (Inuktitut for ‘little stream’) were amongst the last indigenous peoples in North America to have contact with Europeans in the latter part of the 19th century. Inuit have lived in the area for thousands of years as this was an important place for both caribou and sea mammal hunting.


If you are looking for the heart of Nunavut, look no further than Kimmirut, which means “the heel’ in Inuktitut, a reference to the shape of a hill near the community.


Canada’s newest capital will provide you with a fascinating glimpse of the Nunavut territory and its ever-changing culture. The bustling capital is a modern Inuit community, home to Inuit people from around the Territory as well as proud newcomers from around the world.


Millions of people from around the world were captivated by the stark beauty of the Igloolik area through the award-winning films of Igloolik-based Isuma Productions. These films tell many stories of Inuit life and the connections with Europeans, but what they subtly showcase is the tremendous cultural knowledge of the people that reside in Igloolik- hunters, storytellers, keepers of traditional knowledge. When you visit Igloolik you feel as you are entering the spirit of Inuit culture.

Hall Beach

Called Sanirajaq, meaning ‘the shoreline’, the Inuit of Hall Beach have enjoyed and benefitted from the abundance of marine life, including walruses and beluga whales for thousands of years. 

Grise Fiord

Grise Fiord, also known as Aujuittuq in Inuktitut meaning ‘place that never thaws’, nestles amongst majestic mountains at the end of a stunning fiord. As one of the the most isolated communities in the North, the people of Grise Fiord have overcome hardship to establish a home in one of the most beautiful parts of Canada.

Gjoa Haven

Gjoa Haven is located on the southeast coast of King William Island at the heart of the Northwest Passage. It is also called Uqsuqtuuk which means ‘place of plenty blubber’ in Inuktitut. The name Gjoa is named after Norwegian explorer, Roald Amundsen’s ship during his expedition through the Northwest Passage. 

Coral Harbour

Coral Harbour, in Inuktitut Salliq meaning ‘large flat island in front of the mainland’ is located on Southampton Island at the north end of Hudson Bay. It has been a traditional meeting place for Inuit since 500 BC because of the abundance of marine life and migratory birds. It is the base for the best walrus and whale viewing at nearby Coats Island.

Clyde River

There is a special magic in the air around Clyde River. Its Inuktitut name, Kangitugaapik meaning ‘nice little inlet’, belies its stunning beauty and its importance to Inuit for nearly 2000 years.

Chesterfield Inlet

Chesterfield Inlet, located on the northwestern coast of Hudson Bay, is the oldest established community in Nunavut. The Inuktitut name is Igluligaarjuk 'Place with a few Thule Houses’). There are archaeological sites where the ancient Dorset peoples (500BC – 1,500AD) are believed to have camped in the summers.