Cape Dorset

Inuit have congregated in the area for over 3000 years, drawn by the wildlife that provided the necessities of life. The ancient Dorest people are referred to as 'Tuniit' or 'Sivullirmiut' in Inuktitut and historians believe that the Dorset Culture people were perhaps the first North Americans ever encountered by Europeans who visited Baffin Island sometime before 1000 AD. The Dorset people became extinct by 1500 AD, however mystical traces of them are still visible while hiking Mallikjuaq or Dorset Island.

Cambridge Bay

Cambridge Bay, in Inuktitut ‘Ikalutuuttiaq’, means ‘good fishing place’, has been a gathering place for Inuit for over 4000 years. Today, Cambridge Bay continues to welcome Inuit and visitors alike, embracing the traditions of the past while building for the future. 

Baker Lake

Baker Lake’s Inuktitut name is Qamani’tuaq, means “ where the river widens”, those who experience canoeing the great Arctic rivers – the Thelon and the Kazan - know that this is true: Baker Lake is ‘where the river widens’ having reached their final destination. 


Located on the western shores of Hudson’s Bay, Arviat has become the premier destination for viewing Nunavut’s treasured wildlife. In Inuktitut, Arviat means ‘place of the bowhead whale’. Arviat is also reknown for caribou, beluga whales, bird watching, and polar bears. 

Arctic Bay

When you close your eyes and imagine the Arctic, you are likely picturing the hamlet of Arctic Bay. Nestled snugly amidst stunning mountains, Arctic Bay is a traditional community heavily reliant on hunting, fishing, and tourism, It provides visitors with a wide range of Arctic experiences- Inuit culture and tradition, rare Arctic wildlife, and awe-inspiring scenery.